Some people, like the CluetrainManifesto's DocSearls, and Britt Blaser are getting excited about marketing luxury goods. (http://www.blaserco.com/blogs/2003/05/04.html))

Why? Because they see this sector has having the most active and engaged customers. They see the companies in this sector having to pay attention to those customers, and having to establish a dialogue with them.

In short, they see this sector as dealing with emerging netocrats (NetoCracy) and it's always more fun to hang with them than the mere consumtariat.

Consider this quote from Blaser : At Steuben, Mary mined executives' personal contact lists to offer compelling opportunities to known humans in whom the executives had a continuing investment. The database was pristine so the approach to its members also had to be. It worked beyond all expectations. From this base, concentric circles of acquaintanceship and intimacy leveraged both the brand and the relationships, rather than simply diluting the brand. The relationships engage clients, really, beyond even customers, and far removed from mere consumers. Not only are they the brand's clients, they know they are its clients, a fact from which they draw tangible pleasure.

Remind you of anything?

Looked at another way, this is the HighRoad (HowBuildingsLearn) on the adaptive journey that companies and their customers are taking.

UbuntuEdge and GoogleGlass are the same principle. Launch to the uber-geek thought-leaders for a high price, to create NetocraticBling.

I wonder if the HughTrain is marketing to the luxury sector with things like this. Without wishing to sound elitist (though I guess I am going to sound like that), how many people are really connoisseurs of fine stories?

And http://www.gapingvoid.com/Moveable_Type/archives/001434.html

What am I talking about? Hugh is the luxury sector meets blogs. He sells wine, SavileRow suits and now yachts!

BubbleGen loves Etsy : Note how the comments tie the personal to the luxury sector.

But is that necessarily true? Don't we all have access to communities? (maybe especially via AltMoney.) Perhaps it's a conceit to think that the rich are bigger consumers of personal services?

CategoryMarketing, CategoryEconomics