InvisibleVillages (ThoughtStorms)

Article discussing NewLabour and DecentralizedLeft : http://www.renewal.org.uk/issues/2004%20Voulme%2012/Invisible%20Villages.htm

I like it because it ties together a lot of ideas I'm interested in, as illustrated below with

Quotes and links within ThoughtStorms


> The fracturing of society into the mobile and the immobile is a dominant way understanding globalisation (Bauman, Z. (1998) Globalization: The Human Consequences, Cambridge: Polity)


> At a national and international level, a conventional political response is to attempt to turn 'spaces' into 'places', that is, to find ways of attracting and anchoring human and financial capital to particular locations. The growth in iconic architecture, for instance, aims to lure business and people to the likes of Newcastle or Bilbao, to reconnect the local with the non-local ... In such circumstances, political devolution is not born out of petty cultural nostalgia, but out of a desperate need to create a new sense of location in the eyes of global capitalists, because even they need to locate an office somewhere. But what is the equivalent at the level of the community or the neighbourhood? After all, Frank Gehry cannot be brought in to redesign every park bench. Instead, community renewal can be understood in one of two ways. Either it can rest on a sociologically naive and politically regressive appeal to cultural identity, or it can seek out new and rational bases for cooperation rooted in cosmopolitanism.


> At the neighbourhood level, it is shared problems that link 'space' to 'place', that relate individuals to local communities.


See also :